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Faculty Advisory Committee

Assisting the Board of Regents in performing its statutory functions and to report annually to the Higher Education Committee of the General Assembly

About the Faculty Advisory Committee to the Board of Regents for Higher Education

The Faculty Advisory Committee (FAC) was created in the 2011 legislative session, the same year that the community colleges, state universities, and Charter Oak State College were consolidated into one system under the Board of Regents (BOR). The FAC members are elected by the campuses. There are ten voting members - four from the state universities, four from the community colleges and two from Charter Oak - and eight alternates. They include both teaching and non-teaching faculty (the latter also known as professional staff). The Chair and the Vice-chair of the FAC serve as ex-officio, non-voting members of the Board of Regents.

The FAC is charged with representing the perspectives of faculty and staff, and providing information and advice, to the BOR and the legislative committees of cognizance. Legislation requires that the FAC report to the BOR twice a year, and yearly to the Higher Education and Employment Advancement Committee of the Connecticut General Assembly.

Members & Membership

Members shall serve terms of two (2) years provided full-time employment is maintained. New members shall take office in January of even number years following elections conducted by campus governance bodies every two years in the spring semester of the immediately previous odd-number year. Newly elected members may attend meetings in the fall semester to help assure continuity between the outgoing and incoming Committee members but the newly elected members will not have voting power until they take office in January. Details of the election process, the Committee's role, explanations and rationale are recorded in the May 16, 2013 Special Meeting Minutes on the BOR website and shall provide guidance to future Committees on the conduct of uniform, fair, open elections in accordance with the provisions of Connecticut General Statutes § 10a-3a (Sect. 1 (b)).

A. The Committee shall be composed of ten (10) voting faculty members and eight (8) alternates who shall be elected by their peers in accordance with the provisions of Connecticut General Statutes § 10a-3a (Sect. 1 (a))

1. There shall be three (3) faculty voting members and one (1) alternate representing the four (4) Connecticut State Universities (CSU) elected by full-time faculty. The alternate will rotate among the four universities on an annual basis in the following order WCSU (2012) CCSU (2013) ECSU (2014) SCSU (2015). By January 2016, the CSU representatives on the FAC shall determine a four-year cycle for rotating the alternate member among the representative campuses. The selection of a Chair or Vice-Chair may be considered in this determination.

2. There shall be one (1) at-large voting representative and one (1) alternate from among all of the CSUs' administrative faculty who provide direct student services elected by full-time administrative faculty.

3. There shall be three (3) faculty voting members and three (3) alternates from among the 12 (12) Connecticut Community Technical Colleges (CTC). One representative and alternate each will be elected from among the four (4) large, four (4) medium and four (4) small schools as determined by full-time faculty headcount by full-time faculty within each of the three (3) groupings. The alternates are the runners up in each of the three elections.

4. There shall be one (1) at-large voting representative and one (1) alternate from among all of the CTCs' administrative faculty who provide direct student services elected by full-time administrative faculty from all twelve (12) colleges. The alternate is the runner up in voting across the twelve (12) campuses.

5. There shall be one (1) faculty voting member and one (1) alternate elected by a majority vote of the Academic Council of Charter Oak State College (COSC).

6. There shall be one (1) administrative faculty voting member and one (1) alternate elected by a majority vote of the COSC Academic Council.

(From the bylaws of the Faculty Advisory Committee, approved on April 15, 2016)

Member Institution First Name Last Name Email Phone Title/Dept. Term
CSUS-Faculty Central Dr. Stephen Adair * adairs@ccsu.edu 860-832-2979 Prof., Sociology 2016-2017
CSUS-Faculty Southern Dr. Michael Shea sheam1@southernct.edu 203 392-6741 Prof., English 2016-2017
CSUS-Faculty Eastern Dr. William Lugo lugow@easternct.edu 860-465-0163 Assoc. Prof/Chair, Sociology, Anthropology & Social Work 2016-2017
CSUS-Admin Faculty Central Ms. Myrna Garcia-Bowen garciabowenm@ccsu.edu 860-832-2285 Director, Transfer & Academic Articulations 2016-2017
CCs-Large-Faculty NVCC Prof. Del Cummings dcummings@nv.edu 203-596-8701 Prof., Chemistry 2016-2017
CCs-Medium-Faculty Housatonic CC Dr. Barbara Richards ** brichards@hcc.comment.edu 203-332-5164 Prof., Sociology 2016-2017
CCs-Small-Faculty Middlesex CC Dr. Judy Wallace jwallace@mxcc.edu 860-343-5780 Prof./Coordinator, Radiologic Tech 2016-2017
CCs-Administrative-Faculty Manchester CC Mr. T.J. Barber tbarber@mcc.commnet.edu 860-512-3282 Director of Student Activities 2016-2017
COSC-Faculty Charter Oak Dr. Patrice Farquharson pfarquharson@charteroak.edu 203-932-2939 Associate Dean of Faculty 2016-2017
COSC-Administrative Faculty Charter Oak Ms. Linda Wilder lwilder@charteroak.edu 860-515-3862 Director , Prior Learning Assessment 2016-2017
Alternates
CSUS-Faculty-Alternate Western Dr. Jay Brower browerj@wcsu.edu 203-837-8833 Assoc. Prof., Communication and Media Arts 2016-2017
CSUS-Faculty-Alternate Central Ms. Meg Leake leake@ccsu.edu 860-832-1901 Director, The Learning Center 2016-2017
CCs-Large-Faculty-Alternate GCC Prof. Lynn Roller lroller@gateway.edu 203-285-2295 Prof. Allied Health and Director of Distance learning 2016-2017
CCs-Medium-Faculty-Alternate Tunxis CC Prof. Robert Brown rbrown@tunxis.edu 860-773-1608 Prof., History/English 2016-2017
CCs-Administrative-Alternate Housatonic CC Mr. Greg DeSantis *** gdesantis@hcc.commnet.edu 203-332-5064 Associate Director of Financial Aid 2016-2017
COSC-Faculty-Alternate Charter Oak Dr. Krystyna Gorniak-Kocikowska kgorniakkocikowska@charteroak.edu 203-392-6784 Chair, History and Humanities Committee 2016-2017
COSC-Administrative Faculty-Alternate Charter Oak Dr. Ann Marie Gagnon agagnon@charteroak.edu 860-515-3843 Academic Counselor 2016-2017

Meetings

Date Committee Location Agenda
Dec 8, 2017 1:00 pm
Faculty Advisory * 61 Woodland Street, Hartford  

Past Meetings

Date Committee Agenda Minutes
17 11 10
Nov 10, 2017
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf)
17 10 13
Oct 13, 2017
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf)
17 09 08
Sep 8, 2017
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf)
17 08 25
Aug 25, 2017
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf)
17 07 14
Jul 14, 2017
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf)
17 06 09
Jun 9, 2017
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
17 05 12
May 12, 2017
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf)
17 04 21
Apr 21, 2017
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
17 04 07
Apr 7, 2017
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
17 04 06
Apr 6, 2017
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
17 03 31
Mar 31, 2017
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
17 02 10
Feb 10, 2017
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
17 02 10
Feb 10, 2017
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
17 02 03
Feb 3, 2017
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
17 01 20
Jan 20, 2017
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
17 01 20
Jan 20, 2017
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
16 12 09
Dec 9, 2016
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
16 11 11
Nov 11, 2016
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
16 11 04
Nov 4, 2016
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
16 10 21
Oct 21, 2016
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
16 10 14
Oct 14, 2016
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
16 09 23
Sep 23, 2016
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
16 09 09
Sep 9, 2016
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
16 08 26
Aug 26, 2016
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
16 07 07
Jul 7, 2016
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
16 06 10
Jun 10, 2016
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
16 05 25
May 25, 2016
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
16 05 13
May 13, 2016
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
16 04 15
Apr 15, 2016
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
16 03 22
Mar 22, 2016
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
16 03 11
Mar 11, 2016
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
16 02 19
Feb 19, 2016
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
16 01 22
Jan 22, 2016
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
15 12 11
Dec 11, 2015
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
15 11 13
Nov 13, 2015
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
15 10 09
Oct 9, 2015
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf)
15 09 29
Sep 29, 2015
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf)
15 09 11
Sep 11, 2015
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf)
15 08 28
Aug 28, 2015
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
15 06 19
Jun 19, 2015
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
15 05 08
May 8, 2015
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
15 04 24
Apr 24, 2015
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
15 04 02
Apr 2, 2015
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf)
15 03 13
Mar 13, 2015
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
15 02 20
Feb 20, 2015
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
15 02 06
Feb 6, 2015
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
15 01 09
Jan 9, 2015
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
14 12 12
Dec 12, 2014
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
14 11 14
Nov 14, 2014
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
14 10 03
Oct 3, 2014
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
14 09 12
Sep 12, 2014
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
14 08 29
Aug 29, 2014
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
14 06 03
Jun 3, 2014
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
14 05 09
May 9, 2014
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
14 04 11
Apr 11, 2014
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
14 03 28
Mar 28, 2014
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
14 02 14
Feb 14, 2014
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
14 01 17
Jan 17, 2014
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
14 01 10
Jan 10, 2014
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
13 12 20
Dec 20, 2013
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
13 11 15
Nov 15, 2013
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
13 10 18
Oct 18, 2013
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
13 09 20
Sep 20, 2013
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
13 08 23
Aug 23, 2013
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
13 06 21
Jun 21, 2013
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
13 05 16
May 16, 2013
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
13 05 10
May 10, 2013
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
13 04 12
Apr 12, 2013
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
13 03 15
Mar 15, 2013
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
13 02 15
Feb 15, 2013
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
13 01 11
Jan 11, 2013
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
12 12 14
Dec 14, 2012
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
12 11 16
Nov 16, 2012
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
12 10 12
Oct 12, 2012
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
12 09 14
Sep 14, 2012
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
12 06 05
Jun 5, 2012
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
12 05 11
May 11, 2012
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
12 04 13
Apr 13, 2012
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
12 03 02
Mar 2, 2012
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)
12 02 10
Feb 10, 2012
Faculty Advisory * Agenda (pdf) Minutes (pdf)

History

Legislative History

In the 2011 legislation that created the Board of Regents, the FAC was defined as consisting of three members from the state universities, three members from the Community Colleges, and one from Charter Oak. Legislation in 2012 increased the number of members to 10 by adding one administrative faculty member from each of the institutional types. In 2013, the chair of the FAC was given status as an ex officio non-voting member of the BOR effective October 2013, and this status was extended to the vice-chair as well in 2014. Both also serve on committees of the BOR.

Summary of FAC activities

(presented in roughly chronological order)

  • Presented ten recommendations for changes in to the initial draft of the Transfer and Articulation Policy (TAP) to the Academic and Student Affairs Committee (ASA) of the BOR. These were based on hundreds of e-mails solicited from across the 17 institutions. Eight of these policies were accepted by ASA and the BOR.
  • Joined members of the Academic Council on the TAP Coordinating Council to write and adopt an implementation plan for TAP that included the formation of the TAP Steering Committee. Work on the Coordinating Council continues as we develop procedures for the next stages of TAP implementation.
  • Requested from President Kennedy the selection of a Program Manager to assist in TAP implementation.
  • Advised senior management on faculty concerns subsequent to the passage of PA 12-40, the developmental education bill. The FAC has several members on the CSCU advisory committee on PA 12-40, who continue to advocate for thorough research on ongoing efforts and the development of an effective strategy of remediation to promote student success.
  • Advised senior management and the ASA committee against foregoing campus-wide votes on the General Education TAP framework. In the subsequent voting, 15 of the 17 institutions voted in favor of adopting the TAP framework.
  • Testified before the General Assembly’s Higher Education & Employment Advancement Committee on Feb. 28 2013. Testimony begins two hours into the recording at http://ct-n.com/ondemand.asp?ID=8750
  • Contributed to and revised the drafting of the distinct mission statements for the community colleges. Led effort to revise the CSCU mission statement that had initially been approved by the Board on 9/25/2012.
  • Testified in support of FAC representation on BOR.
  • Three FAC representatives participated in the Presidential search advisory committee Spring 2013
  • Developed procedures to facilitate FAC elections through campus governance bodies.
  • Reviewed and discussed with lawmakers the financial problems associated with covering the employee fringe benefits costs from the operating fund due to conversions into the Hybrid SERS plan.
  • Coordinated meeting between campus governance leaders and the FAC.
  • Worked with BOR members and CSCU system staff to revise policies regarding research on human subjects.
  • Passed resolution supporting the call by CT students for a Dream for access to institutional financial aid. Circulated resolution across CSCU governance bodies. Pulled together resolutions from across the system, bundled them and presented to the ASA committee and the state legislature to seek support.
  • Reviewed and provided feedback to the Provost on the 60/120 policy and the program review policy.
  • Met repeatedly with President Gray and with the Boston Consulting Group (BCG) about the proposed plan called Transform CSCU 2020, to present faculty priorities for Transform.
  • Contributed to the Academic Imperatives document written by leadership groups at the state universities and the community colleges.
  • Established and organized an initial FAC/CSCU Conference on Shared Governance and Student Success, and have organized a conference with this theme in the spring of each subsequent year.

Narrative History of Faculty Advisory Committee (FAC) since the Establishment of CSCU (Connecticut State Colleges and Universities)

By Barbara E. Richards

Draft – February 4, 2017

Note: The word “faculty” is used in different ways within CSCU. In most cases, it is used here to refer to faculty and staff.

Disclaimer: This document does not represent the views of any group.

Foundation and Composition

The FAC is an official public body established by law in 2011. At that time, the separate systems of the Connecticut State Universities, the Connecticut Community Colleges, and Charter Oak State College were consolidated into a single system under the direction of the Board of Regents for Higher Education (BOR). The name of the system is Connecticut State Colleges and Universities (CSCU).

Before the consolidation there was a Standing Advisory Committee to the Board of Governors for Higher Education. It included representatives from faculty, students, management, and trustees, and it met regularly with the (former) Department of Higher Education on matters regarding both public and private higher education in Connecticut. It had no official role in advising the Boards of Trustees of the separate systems or the Connecticut General Assembly.

The legislature chose to create the FAC as a faculty body that would advise both the Board of Regents and the legislative committees of cognizance (Committee on Higher Education and Employment, and Appropriations Committee).

The original law provided for membership only by full-time teaching faculty members. It was later amended to add professional staff representatives (“administrative faculty who provide direct service to students”).

Universal elections for the FAC are conducted by campus governance bodies every two years, and the new representatives take office in January of even years.

The FAC is composed of representatives and alternates. According to the bylaws, alternates may attend and participate in meetings, make motions, chair committees, and serve as officers of the FAC. Since the beginning, alternates on the FAC have attended regularly, participate in the work, and are treated as equal except when there is a check on the presence of a quorum or a formal vote count.

For community college faculty, there are three representatives and three alternates. The bylaws specify that the representatives shall come from small, medium, and large colleges. For community college administrative faculty there is one representative and one alternate.

From the universities there are three faculty representatives and one alternate. Each campus elects one FAC member, and the role of alternate is rotated annually. There is also one CSU administrative staff representative and one alternate.

Charter Oak names one faculty and one administrative staff representative and one alternate for each.

The FAC elects three officers: chair, vice-chair, and secretary. The position of chair rotates each year between a CSU person and a CC person, with the other serving as vice-chair. Both sit on the BOR as non-voting ex officio members, and each is a member of a BOR committee.

History

The first four years of the newly-consolidated CSCU system were difficult due to leadership problems at the top. Throughout this period, the FAC did its best to support the interests of the faculty and students, and to work toward the maintenance of an excellent higher education system that would contribute to the well-being of the state of Connecticut. However, the lack of continuity or quality in system leadership was a continual problem.

The first president of CSCU, Robert A. Kennedy, “bowed to mounting pressure for his resignation after disclosures he unilaterally approved executive pay raises without board approval”, and “Michael P. Meotti, executive vice president of the Board of Regents of Higher Education -- and the focus of the pay-raise scandal that slammed the department this week -- became the second top official to resign…”. (CT Mirror, October 12, 2012)

After an interim period without a permanent president of CSCU, Gregory W. Gray was appointed to the position, beginning July 1, 2013.

Soon after President Gray arrived, he began to make use of external consultants. The largest of the consulting contracts was one for almost $2 million awarded in April 2014 to the Boston Consulting Group, to develop a plan called “Transform 2020 CSCU”. The consultants worked through the summer of 2014 with little input from faculty or students, and in the fall the results were disclosed as 36 “initiatives” and 746 “milestones”.

On November 3, 2014, President Gray sent an email to all employees in the CSCU system that included the following words: “Many education pundits now suggest the teacher is no longer the center of learning, and that students learn more from one another than from the faculty. If accurate, this re-alignment means faculty must become "facilitators" of learning. Making greater use of technology, and today's most active channels of student communication, might in fact begin to address this shift.”

One of the “initiatives” in Transform was called “State of the Art Classroom”. The section in that initiative called “Desired Outcomes” states: “Institutions should harness the power of information technology by sharing educational resources among institutions and use distance learning to meet the educational needs of traditional age students and adult learners to reduce instructional costs, increase course availability, and meet critical workforce needs. Specifically this initiative will foster the redesign of programs using a technology-based, learner-centered principles [sic] drawing from an innovative framework such as the one created by the National Center for Academic Transformation. (Spellings Commission, p. 25-26) “ [Note: BOR Chair Nicolas Donofrio, chair of the BOR at that time, was a member of the Spellings Commission.]

NCAT’s website (8/29/15) has a photograph of a classroom with the symbol https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/31/ProhibitionSign2.svg/150px-ProhibitionSign2.svg.png over it. It states that it is “dedicated to the effective use of information technology to improve student learning outcomes and reduce the cost of higher education.” One of their methods of “course redesign” is the “Emporium Model”, which:

“ Eliminates all lectures and replaces them with a learning resource center model featuring interactive software and on-demand personalized assistance.

 Depends heavily on instructional software, including interactive tutorials, practice exercises, solutions to frequently asked questions, and online quizzes and tests.

 Uses a staffing model that combines faculty, graduate teaching assistants, peer tutors, and others who respond directly to students’ specific needs and direct students to resources from which they can learn.”

For many reasons, the Transform 2020 plan inspired immediate strong reactions of mistrust and apprehension among many faculty members throughout the CSCU system.

To prepare for its meeting of November 14, 2014, the FAC assigned itself homework: to study Transform. The agenda had only one item: a discussion and analysis of the plan.

The FAC is a public entity and therefore its meetings are open. When the members arrived for the November 14 meeting they were surprised to find reporters from the CT Mirror and the Hartford Courant in the room.

During the meeting there was extensive criticism of the Transform plan. Rather than write a detailed analysis of the plan, the FAC passed the following resolution: “After careful consideration of Transform CSCU 2020, the Faculty Advisory Committee finds that it lacks focus on academic excellence, consolidates our distinct missions, is so vague as to be meaningless and removes autonomy from local institutions in a manner that has enormous and negative consequences for the educational experiences for our students. In short, it is neither transformational nor aspirational. We cannot endorse Transform CSCU 2020 in its current form.”

The media reported on the FAC resolution, and FAC members began to contact the shared governance bodies (most of them called faculty or college senates) on the 17 campuses to ask them to endorse it. Most of the senates did vote to endorse. This was the beginning of a movement. President Gray continued to take steps that engendered indignation and distrust within the system and in the legislature, and the campuses responded.

The next eight months involved a tremendous amount of work, in a spirit of unity and solidarity, by the FAC, the CCGA (a new body representing all twelve community college senates, with participation by the 4Cs union), and the CSU leadership group (composed of FAC members, union leaders, and Senate chairs).

At one point President Gray announced the formation of a Transform Steering Committee, a belated attempt to involve faculty in planning. The faculty members of that group (which included some from the FAC) worked hard to try to turn it into an effective body, but President Gray summarily disbanded it after only a few weeks.

The opposition continued to grow. On April 22, 2015, two campuses held votes of “no confidence in President Gray or his Transform plan”. By the date of the BOR meeting on May 2, eleven of the 17 campuses had passed such resolutions. At the May 2 board meeting, large numbers of protesters were present, wearing T-shirts that said “Whereas…” on the front and “Be it resolved…” on the back. The resolutions of no confidence and the reasons for the votes were presented to the BOR by the FAC in its report that day, and some of the campus leaders spoke during the period of public comment. The meeting can be seen at http://www.ctn.state.ct.us/ctnplayer.asp?odID=11572 .

President Gray announced his resignation in August of 2015, and the BOR appointed Mark Ojakian, who had been serving as Chief of Staff to Governor Malloy, as president of CSCU effective September 28, 2015.

Since the arrival of President Ojakian, the FAC has gradually developed a collaborative relationship with him, with the system office, and with the BOR. President Ojakian has supported the concept of shared governance. He and his staff have attended FAC meetings and conferences, and worked closely with faculty members of legislative task forces.

In 2016, when President Ojakian decided to appoint six small work groups to develop proposals for system planning, he came to the FAC early in the process and asked for two people to be members of each group. The other work group appointments were top system staff and campus presidents.

The experiences of faculty members on the work groups have been positive in most cases, and when there were problems the system office has been helpful in resolving them.

The FAC members who had been working to fend off damage to the system by its previous president were now included in the planning process and were able to spend time productively, learning about system challenges and ways to improve student experience, knowing that their ideas would be taken seriously.

One of the problems with Transform 2020 had been insufficient participation by the campuses. The six work groups believe that input from everyone in the system is important, and they are soliciting ideas and opinions before preparing their final reports.

The reports of the work groups will be presented to the BOR in the spring of 2017.

In spite of the new spirit of cooperation and mutual respect, there are still major challenges ahead. Labor negotiations are ongoing, and the state budget is in crisis.

Besides the six work groups, other issues the FAC is working on as of February, 2017, include:

- Campus and FAC response to a draft proposal for an employee “Code of Conduct” that may come before the BOR

- Continued work on the final stages of the six system planning groups: Financial Aid, Enrollment and Retention, Human Resources, Branding and Marketing, Compliance, and Purchasing and Contracting

- IT plans and issues

- PA 12-40 (the name of the state statute that prescribed an alteration in the CSCU approach to remedial/developmental education)

- Current legislative proposals, including support for the proposal by undocumented students, led by C4D, to receive a share of state financial aid that comes from tuition – tuition that is paid by all students, including undocumented students.

- New initiatives to collaborate with the Student Advisory Committee to the BOR

- Ongoing issues involving TAP (the Transfer and Articulation Program)

- Issues regarding system plans for library consolidation